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When Is Black Music Month10 min read

Sep 13, 2022 7 min

When Is Black Music Month10 min read

Reading Time: 7 minutes

Every February, the United States celebrates Black History Month. Officially recognized in 1976, Black History Month is a time to commemorate and celebrate the achievements of African Americans throughout history. This year, Black Music Month also falls in February, providing an extra opportunity to appreciate and celebrate black music and its artists.

Black Music Month has its roots in the early 1970s, when a group of black musicians and music industry professionals came together to form the Black Music Association (BMA). Their goal was to promote and celebrate black music and its artists, and to ensure that black music received the same level of recognition as other genres.

In 1978, the BMA successfully lobbied Congress to proclaim the month of February as Black Music Month. Each year since then, the president of the United States has issued a proclamation recognizing Black Music Month and honoring the contributions of black musicians and music industry professionals.

While Black Music Month officially lasts for only one month, its impact can be felt year-round. Throughout the year, there are countless concerts, festivals, and other events that celebrate black music and its artists. Additionally, black music is featured prominently in stores and online retailers, and there are numerous radio stations that specialize in playing black music.

So what is black music? The term can be used to describe a variety of genres, including soul, funk, R&B, hip-hop, reggae, and gospel. What all of these genres have in common is that they are created and performed by black artists.

Black music has a rich and varied history, and its impact can be felt in all corners of the world. This month, take some time to explore and appreciate black music and its artists. There is a lot to discover, and you’re sure to find something that you love.

Why is Black Music Month in June?

Each June, the United States celebrates Black Music Month to honor the African American musicians who have made significant contributions to American music.

Black Music Month originated in 1979 as Black History Month, a time to celebrate the achievements of black Americans. But in 1987, then-U.S. Rep. Ronald Dellums of California proposed a resolution to rename Black History Month as Black Music Month. The resolution was passed, and Black Music Month has been celebrated every June since.

So why is Black Music Month in June?

There are a few theories about why Black Music Month is in June. One theory is that Congress chose June because it’s the month with the longest stretch of days, giving Americans more time to celebrate black music. Another theory is that June was chosen because it’s the month with the most black musical celebrations, including the National Negro Opera Company, the Harlem Renaissance Festival, and the Chicago Blues Festival.

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Whatever the reason, Black Music Month provides a time to celebrate the immense contributions of African American musicians to American music. Throughout the month, there are concerts, music festivals, and other events celebrating black music.

So why not celebrate Black Music Month in style? Check out some of the events happening in your area, and enjoy the music of some of the greatest African American musicians of all time!

When did June become Black Music Month?

Each year, June is celebrated as Black Music Month in the United States. This acknowledgement honors the significant contributions that black musicians have made to American music culture. But when did June specifically become Black Music Month?

The answer to that question is a bit murky. There doesn’t seem to be an official document or proclamation that declares June as Black Music Month. However, there are several credible sources that suggest that the month was first celebrated as such in 1979.

That year, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton introduced a bill to the House of Representatives that would make Black Music Month an official observance. The bill was passed, and ever since then, June has been recognized as a time to celebrate the unique and significant contributions of black musicians to American music culture.

So why June?

Well, there are several reasons. First, June is the month in which black music first achieved mainstream popularity in the United States. In the 1920s and 1930s, black jazz and blues musicians began to gain mainstream success, and their music started to crossover to white audiences.

Second, June is also when many major music festivals and award ceremonies take place. For example, the BET Awards, which celebrate the achievements of black entertainers, take place in June each year.

Finally, June is also the month in which many important black music pioneers were born or died. Some of the most notable figures include Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, and Stevie Wonder.

So, while there isn’t an official document that declares June as Black Music Month, it’s clear that the month has long been recognized as a time to celebrate the important contributions that black musicians have made to American music culture.

Is June still Black Music Month?

Is June still Black Music Month?

Yes, June is still Black Music Month. Established in 1979 by presidential proclamation, Black Music Month celebrates the history and contributions of black Americans in the music industry.

Despite its name, Black Music Month is not just for black artists. The month is intended to celebrate all forms of black music, from gospel and blues to hip-hop and R&B. The goal is to promote awareness and appreciation of black music and its impact on American culture.

This year, there are a number of events and initiatives taking place throughout June to commemorate Black Music Month. The Congressional Black Caucus Foundation is hosting its annual Black Music Honors event on June 26, while the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture is hosting a series of concerts and panel discussions throughout the month.

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There is no question that black music has had a profound impact on American culture. From gospel and blues to rap and hip-hop, black musicians have been at the forefront of some of the most important musical movements in American history.

This year, as we mark the 40th anniversary of Black Music Month, let’s take time to appreciate the contributions of black Americans in the music industry. From artists to producers to engineers, black musicians have helped shape the sound of American music and define our cultural identity.

What is the musical month?

What is musical month?

The musical month is a celebration of music that takes place every year in October. The month-long celebration features concerts, music workshops, and other music-related events throughout the city.

The musical month was founded in 2006 by saxophonist Jens Winther. The goal of the event is to promote music and to give people the opportunity to experience a variety of music styles.

The musical month features concerts and music workshops from a variety of different music styles, including jazz, classical, rock, and world music. The events are open to people of all ages, and tickets are typically inexpensive.

The musical month is a great opportunity for people of all ages to experience a variety of music styles. The events are always fun and informative, and the concerts are always a great way to hear some of the best music that the city has to offer.

What music did slaves listen to?

What music did slaves listen to?

This is a difficult question to answer definitively, as there was no one form of music that was universally listened to by slaves across the United States. However, there were certain genres and styles of music that were particularly popular among slaves. One of the most popular forms of music among slaves was spirituals. Spirituals were religious songs that were often composed by slaves in order to express their faith and hope in the face of adversity. Spirituals were often performed a capella, and featured a strong call-and-response vocal style.

Another popular type of music among slaves was work songs. Work songs were songs that were sung while slaves were working in the fields or on the plantation. Work songs served as a form of communication among slaves, and also helped to keep them motivated while working. Some of the most famous work songs include "Oh, Susanna" and "Wade in the Water".

Another popular type of music among slaves was ragtime. Ragtime was a type of music that was popular in the early 20th century, and was characterized by its syncopated rhythms and blues-inspired melodies. Ragtime was often played on the piano, and was particularly popular in the Southern United States.

While there was no one type of music that was universally listened to by slaves, the genres and styles of music listed above were some of the most popular among them. These forms of music served as a form of expression for slaves, and helped to keep them connected to their African heritage and culture.

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What races make up African-American?

African-Americans are an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestry can be traced to West Africa. The term "African-American" refers to persons who identify themselves as being of African descent and/or who are perceived to be members of the African-American community.

African-Americans are one of the largest and most diverse racial/ethnic groups in the United States. The 2010 U.S. Census counted 43.6 million African-Americans, making up 12.6% of the population. African-Americans are concentrated in the Southern states, but can be found in every region of the country.

There is no one answer to the question "What races make up African-American?" because there is no one African-American community. African-Americans are descendants of immigrants from a variety of countries in Africa, including Cameroon, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, and Senegal. They also include descendants of American slaves who were brought to the United States from all parts of Africa.

African-Americans are a racially diverse group, and there is no one "African-American" race. Some African-Americans have light skin, hair, and eyes, while others have darker skin, hair, and eyes. Some African-Americans identify as white, black, or another race, while others identify as biracial or multiracial.

The African-American community is united by a shared history and culture. African-Americans have developed a unique culture that is based on elements of African and American cultures. African-American culture is evident in music, food, clothing, and language.

Is there a national music day?

There is no national music day in the United States, but there are several unofficial holidays that celebrate various aspects of music.

One of the most popular music holidays is Record Store Day, which is held annually on the third Saturday of April. This event celebrates independent record stores and the music they sell. Record Store Day features exclusive vinyl and CD releases from artists, as well as in-store performances and giveaways.

Another popular music holiday is Rockin’ Around the Clock Day, which is held annually on April 18. This holiday celebrates rock and roll music, and encourages people to listen to rock and roll records, go to concerts, and learn about the history of the genre.

There is also no official national music day in Canada, but there are several unofficial holidays that celebrate various aspects of music. One of the most popular music holidays is JUNO Awards Day, which is held annually on the second Sunday of March. This event celebrates Canadian music, and features awards shows, concerts, and other musical events.

Another popular music holiday is Canada Day, which is held annually on July 1. This holiday celebrates Canadian culture, and includes a variety of musical events and performances.